Authors
    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Internal Medicine

    Dr. Seymour is Assistant Professor of Critical Care and Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He is core faculty member in the Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness (CRISMA) Center in the Department of Critical Care. Dr. Seymour received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania before completing his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He then completed a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Washington, where he obtained master’s degree in clinical epidemiology at the University of Washington, School of Public Health. Dr. Seymour’s research program focuses on the development of early diagnostic and prognostic models to facilitate treatments for those with acute illness, particularly during prehospital and emergency care. His current NIH/NIGMS funded research (K23, R35), seeks to identify sepsis endotypes to target treatment in the emergency department. He spends his clinical time attending the Medical Intensive Care Unit at UPMC-Mercy Hospital.

    • Professor of Medicine at Brown University, The Warren Alpert Medical School

    Mitchell M. Levy MD is Chief, Division of Critical Care, Pulmonary, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where he is Professor of Medicine.  He is also Medical Director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island.  Dr. Levy is a founding member (2002) and a member of the Executive Committee of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, a global initiative to improve the care of patients with severe sepsis.  He is the lead investigator for Phase III of the campaign, the goal of which is to facilitate adoption of evidence-based guidelines for sepsis management into clinical practice and reduce mortality in severe sepsis by 25% by 2009.  Dr. Levy is Past-President of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (2009).  Dr. Levy’s current research interests include biomarkers in sepsis, end-of-life care in the ICU, and knowledge translation.  He has authored over 130 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.   He is the co-director of the Ocean State Clinical Coordinating Center, which manages large, international, multi-center clinical trials in sepsis.  Dr. Levy is very active in the field of quality and safety.  He continues to serve as the representative to the National Quality Forum for SCCM and also serves on the advisory committees on Quality for the Blue Distinction program of Blue Cross Blue Shield of America.  Dr. Levy has worked on several state-wide initiatives on quality, including Rhode Island and New Jersey, and has led a similar initiative for the New York City Health and Hospital Corporation in their quality initiative in catheter-related bloodstream infection and sepsis.  He was recently appointed a content expert and voting member of the Hospital Workgroup of the Measure Applications Partnership (MAP) of the National Quality Forum and serves as a technical expert for the project Closing the Quality Gap:  Prevention of Healthcare-associated Infections, which is part of the Evidence-Based Practice Center (EPC) program of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

    • Emergency Medicine
    • Surgical Critical Care
    Washington University; Emergency Medicine and Surgical / Trauma Critical Care
    Washington University; Emergency Medicine and Surgical / Trauma Critical Care
    • Professor of Surgery and Emergency Medicine at Washington university
    Tiffany Osborn, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor with joint appointments working both in the Surgical / Trauma Intensive Care Unit and in the Emergency Department at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. She is the ACEP representative to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, is on the resuscitation guidelines writing committee and an author of the international guidelines on severe sepsis and septic shock management. She currently serves on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national Sepsis Task Force. She worked on the National Quality Forum's Infectious Disease Committee, which vets potential CMS measures for possible national implementation. Dr. Osborn is a sepsis consultant for the Institute of Healthcare Improvement and worked with IHI's team to implement sepsis measures across multiple hospitals in New York. Dr. Osborn completed a Masters of Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine before begining work with the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) in London, England. She worked for ICNARC as the trial clinician for Protocolised Management in Sepsis (ProMISe) - a government funded RCT across 56 sites in England. Upon returning to the United States was awarded a scholarship to the Olin Business School's Leadership for Women program. Her publications center around: quality improvement, severe sepsis, biomarkers, resuscitation, trauma and critical care certification for emergency medicine physicians.
    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Internal Medicine
    • Pulmonary Disease
    • Health Services Research
    • Critical Care
    • Epidemiology, Statistics and data analysis
    • sepsis
    Assistant Professor in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan
    Assistant Professor in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan
    • Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at University of Michigan

    Hallie Prescott, MD, MSc is an assistant professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan and a core investigator at the VA Ann Arbor Center for Clinical Management Research. She practices clinically in the medical intensive care units at the University of Michigan and Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. Her research focuses on sepsis survivorship. Her work examines how sepsis fits into a patient’s broader trajectory, and how we can reduce post-sepsis morbidity. She has taught us about the high rate of post-acute care use, hospital readmission, and late death in sepsis survivors. She’s shown that many survivors die following hospital re-admissions for infections, suggesting that post-sepsis immune-suppression is an enduring problem that contributes to late sepsis-related deaths. She’s also shown that microbiome disruption increases risk for subsequent sepsis. Taken together, her research has highlighted the role of specific treatable medical conditions in driving post-sepsis morbidity. She has a NIH career development award to support her research, and is also a past recipient of an ATS Foundation grant. She is currently serving at the inaugural Lowry-Fink fellow for the International Sepsis Forum.

     

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Associate Professor at University of Michigan and VA Ann Arbor Center for Clinical Management Research

    Theodore “Jack” Iwashyna, MD, PhD, is a medical intensivist and health services researcher at the University of Michigan. His work has focused on understanding the long-term outcomes from sepsis, cardiac arrest, and other critical illnesses—and in identifying opportunities for systems to improve the recovery of such survivors. He is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine in Pulmonary & Critical Care at the University of Michigan. There, he is also co-director of the National Clinician Scholars Program and a Faculty Associate of the Survey Research Center. He also co-directs the Research Core of the Center for Clinical Management Research at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. His MD was from the University of Chicago, where he also earned his PhD from the Harris School of Public Policy.