Authors
    • Associate Investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

    Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH’s research focuses on understanding how infectious diseases spread, and on designing and evaluating interventions such as vaccination programs. Dr. Jackson is the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) principal investigator for the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network. This Network aims to provide ongoing evaluations of the U.S. influenza vaccination program. Dr. Jackson uses data from this Network to study influenza vaccine effectiveness, to estimate the burden of disease caused by influenza, and to advance the methodology of vaccine effectiveness studies. He also uses mathematical models to predict the impact of vaccination programs on the spread of infectious diseases such as Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis. Dr. Jackson is a co-investigator on the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) Project. The VSD, a collaboration among nine U.S. managed care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the world’s premier system for post-licensure studies of vaccine safety. As a VSD co-investigator, Dr. Jackson leads studies of the safety of childhood immunizations and develops methods for using managed care data for vaccine safety studies. While studying for his PhD at the University of Washington, Dr. Jackson was a graduate research associate with KPWHRI from 2002 to 2007, and then a postdoctoral fellow at KPWHRI from 2007 to 2008. He then spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer with the CDC in Atlanta. As an EIS officer, Dr. Jackson helped lead investigations of whooping cough outbreaks and of the 2009 influenza pandemic. He also designed and oversaw an enhanced surveillance system for invasive Hib disease in the U.S. during the 2008–2009 shortage of Hib vaccines. He returned to KPWHRI as an assistant investigator in 2010.

    • Infectious Disease
    • Chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch, Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Alicia M. Fry M.D., M.P.H., is currently the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch. The EPB branch is responsible for conducting influenza surveillance, working to understand influenza disease burden, helping to derive appropriate vaccine and antiviral use policies to prevent seasonal influenza, detecting and preventing avian influenza and pandemic influenza, and providing technical expertise to global public health partners. Dr. Fry coordinates epidemiologic activities related to influenza antiviral resistance surveillance, and provides technical guidance on influenza antiviral agents for the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, Dr. Fry was a lead for the clinical and antiviral team during the spring and was the team lead for field investigations during the fall. She is the project officer for clinical trials in Bangladesh, Wisconsin and Kentucky designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the antiviral drug oseltamivir in different study populations. Dr. Fry joined the CDC in 1999 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer in the Respiratory Diseases Branch of the Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. In subsequent years, she served as a medical officer in the division’s Foodborne and Diarrheal Disease Branch and the International Activities Branch of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination in the National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention. Prior to her current post, Dr. Fry was the medical officer and team lead for the Respiratory and Enterovirus team of the Epidemiology Branch in NCIRD’s Division of Viral Diseases. Dr. Fry earned her Doctorate of Medicine from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio. After completing her residency in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Dr. Fry completed subspecialty training in infectious diseases and a molecular medicine fellowship at the University of California-San Francisco. She subsequently earned her Master of Public Health from the University of California-Berkeley. She is the author of numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, textbook chapters and CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports. In addition to her work at the CDC, Dr. Fry serves as a clinician in the Infectious Diseases Clinic for the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

    • Epidemiology
    • Vaccination
    Epidemiologist, Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Epidemiologist, Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at Centers for Disease Control...
    • Epidemiologist, Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Brendan Flannery, PhD, is an epidemiologist with the Influenza Division in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. He leads the US influenza vaccine effectiveness network (or US Flu VE Network) for CDC, which evaluates the level of protection provided by influenza vaccines against circulating influenza viruses in the US population each year. Dr. Flannery received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from Stanford University, his Masters of Public Health and doctorate in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined CDC in 2002 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer in the Respiratory Diseases Branch of the Division of Bacterial Diseases, where he began his work on immunizations. He has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles.